Eatglobe Eatglobe

Dieser Text wurde noch nicht übersetzt. Wir danken für Ihr Verständnis.

EU parliament rejects GM compromise

The draft law, rejected both by proponents and critics of GM, would have allowed individual EU countries to prohibit the use of GM products

Quelle:: EU, Euractiv

Anti-GMO demonstration, Toronto, Canada, 25 May 2015
Anti-GMO demonstration, Toronto, Canada, 25 May 2015

The European Parliament rejected yesterday, by a vote of 557 to 75, a law proposed by the European Commission, which would have made it possible for individual EU member states to decide for themselves whether to allow the import of genetically modified (GM) products.

Another EU law, approved in January, already makes it possible for member states to prohibit the cultivation of GM products, but not their import.

The European Parliament in Strasbourg, 20 March 2013
The European Parliament in Strasbourg, 20 March 2013

Currently only one GM product, maize, is permitted for production in the EU and another 58 are allowed for import into the Union. More than 90 percent of the production of GM maize takes place in Spain.

The large majority, by which the law was rejected, seems to have come from both proponents and critics of GM products.

The GM industry was unhappy with the opt-out provision per se, while GM critics feared that the law would have left loopholes.

Anti-GMO demonstration, Toronto, Canada, 25 May 2015
Anti-GMO demonstration, Toronto, Canada, 25 May 2015

Another argument voiced against the law was that, to enforce a GM ban issued by individual EU member states, border controls would have to be reintroduced.

The European Commission, which has spent years to find a compromise that would take the heat out of the GM debate, has announced it will stick to its proposal and discuss next steps with EU environment ministers.

This will not change the fact that, without parliament's approval, the opt-out provision cannot enter into force.

GM maize planted in New Zealand, 24 March 2014
GM maize planted in New Zealand, 24 March 2014

Michael ist Eatglobe's Gründer und unser WIrtschafts- und Handelsexperte.
Send an email to Michael

Creative Commons Licence Der Text dieses Artikels kann frei verwendet werden, sofern Eatglobe als Quelle angeführt wird. Die Fotos können nicht benützt werden, außer jene, die mit Wikimedia verlinkt sind.